Miss Evelyn Whyte

no-picture-square3Evelyn Whyte, 48, (1884-1972) was General Secretary of the Parents’ National Educational Union (PNEU) and thus will be well known to fellow table guest The Hon. Mrs Franklin, the Hon. Sec. for the PNEU. She was educated at the same school as Lady Rhondda, St. Leonard’s, St. Andrew’s Fife, albeit a year younger. So two very strong links, to the table and to the guest of honour – but apart from that we have as yet little further information, a little surprising for someone who at least gets a Who’s Who entry and a notice of her passing in The Times.

puzzle-piece2-50Can you tell us more about Evelyn Whyte?

SEATED BESIDE

Under our current plan she is besides fellow PNEU member “Netta” Franklin and surgeon extraordinaire Dr Louisa Martindale. Which ought to make for a good evening.

WHAT’S ON HER MIND?

Perhaps she has PNEU ideas she would like to discuss with The Hon. Mrs Franklin, though probably would not talk shop. She may have tales from school to relate about the guest of honour. Hmmm..

EVELYN’S STORY SO FAR

Evelyn Whyte was born on 15th August 1884 in Lee, Kent, one of 6 children, to Lewisham-born Ruth Colman Jay (daughter of a bank clerk) and her husband, Bishopsgate-born Robert Whyte and South African merchant. She was educated at St Leonard’s School, St Andrews, Fife (like Lady Rhondda, albeit one year younger). She became General Secretary of the Parents’ National Educational Union (PNEU), 26 Victoria St SW1 (at least in 1934), and lived at 7 Oakcroft Road, Blackheath.[1]

WHAT EVELYN DID NEXT

At the same (Lewisham) address in 1939, she was an occupation Secretary, living with her sister Elsie Jeanie Whyte and her widowed sister Dorothy Webb. Both she and Dorothy were ARP Wardens during WW2. Evelyn died in hospital in Hindhead, Surrey, age 87 on the 26th March 1972, 41 years on from the dinner, the “beloved sister of Elsie Jeanie Whyte”.[2]

BACK TO TABLE 10


[1] Miss Evelyn Whyte, Hutchinson’s Woman’s Who’s Who 1934, Hutchinson & Co. London.

[2] The Times, 28.3.1972

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